The Top Ten Tourist Attractions of Austria

Top Ten Tourism Sites in Austria. A List Based On the Number of Visitors

Austria is an amazing travel destination. Full of history, beautiful landscapes, cultural riches and equipped with a fine hospitality this little country in the heart of Europe attracts some millions of visitors from all over the world each year. The curious visitor will find sites which cater to virtual all needs and wants. History buffs, nature-lovers and enthusiasts of the urban lifestyle alike will all be satisfied by the many attractions Austria has to offer. But travel time is usually too short and the poor traveler is to be spoiled for choice.

This hub lists the top ten most attractive tourist sites of Austria. The selection of these sites is not by myself. As I am living in this country I would probably be too subjective in selecting the most attractive tourist sites. Instead this list is based on the ‘election’ of the fellow visitors themselves. I have ordered all major Austrian tourist sites according to their number of annual visitors (data provided by the official Austrian tourism agency).

The list includes both old treasures like some of the many imperial buildings in Vienna or the old castle of Hohensalzburg with its roots in medieval times as well as more modern ones (Riesenrad in the Prater made famous by Orson Welles’ ‘The Third Man’) and the Crystal Worlds (exhibition show of Swarovski) in Wattens (Tyrol). The list does not include sites which are basically free to visit, since nobody counts the millions of people which are wandering around the Saint Stephens Cathedral in Vienna or in the streets of the old city of Salzburg.

Schloss Schönbrunn

Imperial summer palace. Photo by Gryffindor, distributed under CC AttributionsShareAlike 3.0
Imperial summer palace. Photo by Gryffindor, distributed under CC AttributionsShareAlike 3.0

Fortress Hohensalzburg

Fortress Hohensalzburg as seen from the Mirabell garden. Photy by Amidiarone distributed under CC AttributionsShareAlike 3.0
Fortress Hohensalzburg as seen from the Mirabell garden. Photy by Amidiarone distributed under CC AttributionsShareAlike 3.0

Grossglockner High Alpine Road

Grossglockner High Alpine Road near the Fuscher Törl (2404m).
Grossglockner High Alpine Road near the Fuscher Törl (2404m).

Old View of the Basilica Mariazell

The small town of Mariazell and the Basilica around 1900.
The small town of Mariazell and the Basilica around 1900.

Great Ferris Wheel Prater, Vienna

Great Ferris Wheel, Prater. Photo by Jewa. Distrubuted under CC AttributionsShareAlike 3.0.
Great Ferris Wheel, Prater. Photo by Jewa. Distrubuted under CC AttributionsShareAlike 3.0.

Abbey Melk

Abbey Melk. Photo by Walter Hochauer.
Abbey Melk. Photo by Walter Hochauer.

Belvedere Palace

Belvedere, Summer Palace of Prince Eugen von Savoyen.
Belvedere, Summer Palace of Prince Eugen von Savoyen.
  1. Schönbrunn Palace is the most visited tourist attraction of Austria. Its unique style of imperial Baroque painted in the archetypical Hapsburg light yellow makes it the undisputed number one. Schönbrunn is a huge complex of various additional buildings (such as the Gloriette or the Palm house) in a landscaped garden complete with a labyrinth. Schönbrunn was the summer residence of the Hapsburg family and the birthplace of Emperor Franz Josef (born 1830). Attached to Schönbrunn is one of the world’s oldest and largest zoo which has been modernized recently according to the highest standards.
  2. The Fortress Hohensalzburg is the dominant landmark of Salzburg, the city of Mozart. Towering above the old city this castle dates back as early as to the twelfth century. Continuously revamped and fortified it grew to one of the mightiest castles in Central Europe ensuring the power of the Roman-Catholic Archbishops who ruled Salzburg until the late eighteenth century.
  3. The Grossglockner High Alpine Road connects the two provincial states Salzburg and Carinthia over the high mountain passes just in the vicinity of the Grossglockner, Austria’s highest mountain (3798m). The road is mainly for sightseeing travel and is closed during winter (October – May).
  4. The Basilica Mariazell is located a two hour car-ride in the South-West of Vienna. Probably not that prominent at an international level it is an important pilgrim location for Roman-Catholics. Pope Johannes Paul II (in 1983) and Pope Benedict XVI (2007) visited Mariazell during their official voyages to Austria.
  5. The Giant Ferris Wheel is a prominent Viennese landmark in the Prater, an old traditional amusement park just between the Danube and the inner city. The Giant Ferris Wheel was built in 1896/1897 and recently revamped. The Giant Ferris Wheel gained international prominence while featuring in “The Third Man” (1947, with Orson Wells), a film playing in the desperate post-war years of Vienna. Riding the Giant Ferris Wheel gives an amazing overview of the Viennese City, especially to the old city area around St. Stephen’ Cathedral.
  6. The Schlossberg Graz with the Clock Tower is the landmark of Graz, capital of the provincial state of Styria and Austria’s second largest city (350.000 inhabitants).
  7. Swarovski Crystal Worlds is a theme-park exhibition showcasing the crystal jewellery of Swarovski. It was built in 1995 and designed by Austrian artist André Heller.
  8. The Melk Abbey is located some 100 km West of Vienna on a rocky hill above the Danube marking the Western end of the Wachau, a unique river landscape along the Danube. The abbey was founded as early as 1089 and has been a centre of Christian scholarship ever since. Its monastic library is of worldwide fame and its scriptorium has had enormous influence during the medieval ages. In the early eighteenth century the abbey was rebuild as a Baroque castle designed by famous Austrian architect Jakob Prandtauer.
  9. The Museum of Fine Arts at the Ringstrasse (just opposite the Hofburg, the imperial palace) was built in 1891. Originally it was built to showcase the many collections of the imperial family. Today it is still considered as one of the major museums housing eminent work of world famous artists such as Bruegel, Rembrandt, Dürer, Vermeer and many others.
  10. The Belvedere in Vienna’s third district (just near the Südbahnhof and the Schwarzenbergplatz) was originally built as the summer palace of Prince Eugen von Savoyen, a famous and successful military leader in the eighteenth century. Designed by Austrian baroque architect Lukas von Hildebrandt it is worth a visit just due to its architectural style. However, its museum is also show casting the world’s largest Gustav Klimt collection together with an array of other famous Austrian artists like Egon Schiele and Oskar Kokoschka.

Source: http://euro-pen.hubpages.com/hub/Top-Ten-Attractions-Austria

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A Local’s Guide to the 10 Must-Try Taiwanese Street Foods

Snack-size portion of fried chicken. Perfect for on-the-go!

Endless snacking: one of Taiwan’s most beloved traditions. Traditional street stalls and tiny restaurants litter the streets, and some of the most famous attractions are night markets jam-packed with vendors hawking snack-sized portions of fried chicken and tempura With a veritable glut of delectable choices, focusing your appetite can seem an impossible task. Let a local get you started with 10 traditional snack food (小吃) suggestions essential to any Taiwan visit.

1. Oyster Omelet (蚵仔煎)

As an island country, Taiwan loves its seafood. Oyster omelets, which originated in Taiwan, are commonly considered one of the world’s most addictive dishes. Piles of fresh oysters dumped on top of crispy fried eggs and thickened with potato starch give the oysters a thick, chewy texture that both contrasts and complements the crunchiness of the egg. Right before they’re taken off the grill, the omelets are topped with cilantro and savory sauce to add layers of taste and texture. At Shilin Night Market in Taipei—one of Taiwan’s largest and most widely renowned night markets—numerous stalls peddle this tantalizing traditional treat.

2. Slack Season’s Dan Zai Noodles (擔仔麵)

A Tainan fisherman allegedly invented this pork-and-prawn dish a century ago when he decided to sell noodles during the slack season. Egg noodles are served in a shrimp-based soup with minced pork, bean sprouts and a sprinkling of coriander. His noodles were so popular that he gave up fishing to dish up dan zai noodles full time. His store, Slack Season (度小月擔仔麵), still resides in Tainan, a city known for its Taiwanese snack foods. Street stalls throughout Taiwan have adopted dan zai noodles as a national dish.

3. Iron Eggs (鐵蛋)

Iron eggs are quail eggs marinated in soy sauce until black and chewy. The eggs are repeatedly braised in soy sauce and spices over the course of several days. Iron eggs wer allegedly invented when a cook, Huang Zhangnian (黃張哖), decided to re-cook leftover marinated eggs after they had cooled. Her store, A-Po’s Iron Eggs (阿婆鐵蛋) is still running and is located in the bustling markets of Danshui, a seaside town north of Taipei. Eggs come fresh in boxes or vacuum-sealed plastic for you to take home as delicious souvenirs.

4. Tempura (甜不辣)

Don’t be fooled by the name—this is NOT the Japanese tempura famous in sushi shops across the US. Taiwanese tempura is spiced seafood paste molded into different shapes, deep-fried and boiled in broth. The fried tempura are eaten separately from the broth and smothered in sauce. The broth is then poured back into the bowl at the end to wash out the remnants of the sauce and tempura. Tempura come in various flavors depending on the seafood (fish, shrimp, octopus or scallop). The Keelung Temple Night Market in Keelung, famous for its fresh seafood, is the ideal place to try tempura.

5. Fried Chicken (鹽酥雞)

This isn’t your typical Colonel Sanders Kentucky fry. Taiwan removed the bones and chopped the chicken into bite-sized chunks for marination. The chicken pieces are deep-fried, seasoned with salt and white pepper and served as snack food. The chicken is usually fried up with basil for an extra layer of flavor. You can also mix your chicken with other fried foods. Some popular variations are mushrooms, fish balls, and seafood. Eat them on skewers as you wander the Feng Chia Night Market in Taichung, the originator of this addictive snack.

6. Scallion Pancakes (蔥抓餅)

Traditional scallion pancakes are comprised of flatbread dough folded with oil and scallions, fried up and served piping hot. Flaky with a crispy outer covering, scallion pancakes are sometimes served thin with an egg coating, slathered with sauce and folded for easy transport. Some stalls add meat and vegetables for a more filling meal. Other stalls fold fillings, usually scallions and pork, in the middle of the dough before frying. A popular snack across Taiwan, every stall has their own variations and specialities! Try scallion pancakes at any night market for a delicious start to your night.

7. Large Sausage Wrapped around a Small Sausage (大腸包小腸)

Think of it as a Taiwanese hotdog. Traditional Taiwanese sausages are generally pork-based and relatively sweet with emulsified fat and meat. The sausage is wrapped in sticky rice to form a huge sausage. Like American hotdogs, they are eaten with condiments—but not of the Heinz and French’s variety. Thick soy sauce and pickled vegetables make palatable add-ons. Find the biggest and tastiest sausages at Shi Lin Night Market in Taipei, thought to have invented the dish a couple decades ago.

8. Stinky Tofu (臭豆腐)

Stinky tofu is infamous. While its smell may be initially off-putting, this snack is worth pinching your nose. You may even come to like the fragrance after several bites. While variations of stinky tofu are found throughout China, Taiwan is unique in deep-frying the tofu on a skewer before piling on pickled vegetables and sauce. The vegetables cut the greasiness from the frying, while the sauce smothers some of the smell and adds a savoriness to the dish. Every stall has its own variations on the vegetables and sauce, so try it at any—or all—night markets. Just make sure it’s freshly out of the fryer when you dig in.

9. Pork Vermicelli (米線)

While Taiwanese vermicelli is usually served with oysters, one of the best vermicelli places in the heart of Taipei removes the oysters completely and stews it with intestines. Ah-Chung Flour Rice Noodles in Xi Men Ding only serves intestine noodles, and it’s not hard to see why. Served in a thick, savory soup base, the noodles are tender and slurpable, and the pork intestines are soft but chewy. Splash in a bit of chili and black vinegar, and you have the best belly-warming food for a stroll through the bustling streets of Taipei at night.

10. Pork Ball (貢丸湯)

A helping of pork balls in clear soup makes a mouth-watering conclusion to a night of lip-smacking indulgence. These aren’t quite Western-style meatballs. They have a similar texture to fish paste balls and are typically cooked in a clear, bone-based broth with coriander leaves and green onions. The clear soup will cleanse your palate at the end of a long night, and the chewy pork balls add just enough flavor and texture to hold your interest. Hsinchu is famous for its pork balls, so have a taste at the City God Temple Night Market downtown.
Of course, the best way to enjoy these dishes is all together. Grab a snack-size serving of each dish and keep walking—and eating. I guarantee you’ll be full and satisfied by the end of the night!

Source: http://www.nerdwallet.com/blog/travel/2012/locals-guide-10-musttry-taiwanese-street-foods/

18 Chilling Photographs Of Abandoned Buildings Around Europe

Dutch photographer Niki Feijen travels the globe looking for abandoned buildings, photographing forgotten structures before they crumble and collapse.

Dutch photographer Niki Feijen travels the globe looking for abandoned buildings, photographing forgotten structures before they crumble and collapse.

Niki Feijen / Via nikifeijen.nl

A beautiful staircase inside “Chateau de Loup”, an abandoned castle in Belgium.

Niki doesn’t use any artificial light sources when exploring, but instead uses subtle HDR technique to capture the often dimly lit locations.

Niki doesn’t use any artificial light sources when exploring, but instead uses subtle HDR technique to capture the often dimly lit locations.

Niki Feijen / Via nikifeijen.nl

A stained glass window at “Chateau Clochard”, 15th century castle located in a small French village. Sadly a fire ravaged the remains of the castle in 2012.

Niki told BuzzFeed: “The fascination for abandoned places started when I was a kid. There was an old abandoned house with a factory close to my town.”

Niki told BuzzFeed: "The fascination for abandoned places started when I was a kid. There was an old abandoned house with a factory close to my town."

Niki Feijen / Via nikifeijen.nl

This abandoned late 18th century chapel is definitely the “holy grail of urban exploration (urbex)”.

“I passed it a zillion times until finally I had the guts to have a peek inside. The adrenaline, the excitement. It was amazing.”

"I passed it a zillion times until finally I had the guts to have a peek inside. The adrenaline, the excitement. It was amazing."

Niki Feijen / Via nikifeijen.nl

Dining room inside an abandoned 5-star hotel.

“Years and years later when I was photographing rally races and rock concerts I found out that there were people who photographed abandoned buildings.”

"Years and years later when I was photographing rally races and rock concerts I found out that there were people who photographed abandoned buildings."

Niki Feijen / Via nikifeijen.nl

“Seeing these shots brought back memories and soon I was on my way to shoot my first location. That was almost a decade ago.”

"Seeing these shots brought back memories and soon I was on my way to shoot my first location. That was almost a decade ago."

Niki Feijen / Via nikifeijen.nl

Fear and decay in an abandoned prison.

“I think people love abandoned photography because you get lost in the photographs. Your imagination is running wild. What happened here, why was it abandoned?”

"I think people love abandoned photography because you get lost in the photographs. Your imagination is running wild. What happened here, why was it abandoned?"

Niki Feijen / Via nikifeijen.nl

Escher-esque staircases at an abandoned factory.

“I rarely set anything up inside a location. Some people think I bring props or furniture with me. Trust me my backpack with camera gear is heavy enough!”

"I rarely set anything up inside a location. Some people think I bring props or furniture with me. Trust me my backpack with camera gear is heavy enough!"

Niki Feijen / Via nikifeijen.nl

Rays of light pierce the dust in this amazing abandoned Chapel.

“I don’t use any artificial light sources but use subtle HDR technique to capture the broad spectrum of natural light in the dim lit locations.”

"I don’t use any artificial light sources but use subtle HDR technique to capture the broad spectrum of natural light in the dim lit locations."

Niki Feijen / Via nikifeijen.nl

An abandoned veterinary school basement. The jars are filled with animal remains like intestines, hearts, lungs and severed dog heads submerged in formaldehyde.

“Some locations require minutes of exposure time to take the shot. Others require up to 9 different exposures to capture both the darkest and the brightest areas.”

"Some locations require minutes of exposure time to take the shot. Others require up to 9 different exposures to capture both the darkest and the brightest areas."

Niki Feijen / Via nikifeijen.nl

“Most people love HDR but some hate it. It’s is just a matter of opinion and taste.”

"Most people love HDR but some hate it. It’s is just a matter of opinion and taste."

Niki Feijen / Via nikifeijen.nl

Slides at an abandoned water park in Austria.

“It’s hard to pick a favorite place but one that is very special was an abandoned hotel in Germany. I visited it twice, during winter and during summer.”

"It’s hard to pick a favorite place but one that is very special was an abandoned hotel in Germany. I visited it twice, during winter and during summer."

Niki Feijen / Via nikifeijen.nl

“The place had partly been ravaged by a fire a few years ago and left the roof destroyed. Because of that the hotel was exposed to the elements.”

"The place had partly been ravaged by a fire a few years ago and left the roof destroyed. Because of that the hotel was exposed to the elements."

Niki Feijen / Via nikifeijen.nl

Decayed organ inside an abandoned church.

“As a result the rooms turned into scenes which could come from a Tim Burton movie.”

"As a result the rooms turned into scenes which could come from a Tim Burton movie."

Niki Feijen / Via nikifeijen.nl

“I am a very down to earth guy and do not believe in ghosts or the paranormal.”

"I am a very down to earth guy and do not believe in ghosts or the paranormal."

Niki Feijen / Via nikifeijen.nl

“However roaming around a former 5 star luxurious hotel I encountered so many strange things that I was really glad when I stood outside again.”

"However roaming around a former 5 star luxurious hotel I encountered so many strange things that I was really glad when I stood outside again."

Niki Feijen / Via nikifeijen.nl

“Theatre des Reines” is a well-hidden abandoned art-deco ballroom in Versaille, France, totally unrecognizable from the outside.

“Doors slamming shut, curtains moving and a lot of camera problems. Batteries completely drained while they were charged just hours before.”

"Doors slamming shut, curtains moving and a lot of camera problems. Batteries completely drained while they were charged just hours before."

Niki Feijen / Via nikifeijen.nl

“Church of the 9 Ghosts” – An abandoned church inhabited by nine ‘ghosts’ sitting in the pews dressed in wrinkly white cloths. Spooky.

Niki’s new book Frozen will be officially released at the Berliner Liste art fair in Berlin this September. However as of this week pre-order is available here.

Niki's new book Frozen will be officially released at the Berliner Liste art fair in Berlin this September. However as of this week pre-order is available here .

Niki Feijen / Via nikifeijen.nl

Inspirational Quotes on Dreams and Passion

Inspirational Quote: Achieving our Goals and Dreams

  1. “It is never too late to be what you might have been.” – George Eliot
  2. “If what you’re doing is not your passion, you have nothing to lose.” – Celestine Chua
  3. “At first dreams seem impossible, then improbable, then inevitable.” – Christopher Reeve
  4. “Remembering you are going to die is the best way I know to avoid the trap of thinking you have something to lose. You are already naked. There is no reason not to follow your heart.” ~ Steve Jobs.
  5. Do what you love and the money will follow.” – Marsha Sinetar
  6. “The more I want to get something done, the less I call it work.” – Richard Bach
  7. “Don’t ask yourself what the world needs, ask yourself what makes you come alive. And then go and do that. Because what the world needs is people who are alive.” – Howard Thurman
  8. “All our dreams can come true – if we have the courage to pursue them.” – Walt Disney
  9. “If you have built castles in the air, your work need not be lost; that is where they should be. Now put foundations under them.” – Henry David Thoreau
  10. “No matter where you are in life right now, no matter who you are, no matter how old you are – it is never too late to be who you are meant to be.” – Esther & Jerry Hicks
  11. “There’s nothing capricious in nature, and the implanting of a desire indicates that its gratification is in the constitution of the creature that feels it.” – Ralph Waldo Emerson
  12. “Don’t be afraid of the space between your dreams and reality. If you can dream it, you can make it so.” – Belva Davis
  13. “I challenge you to make your life a masterpiece. I challenge you to join the ranks of those people who live what they teach, who walk their talk.” ~ Tony Robbins

    Inspirational Quote: Meaning of Life

  14. “The world makes way for the man who knows where he is going.” – Ralph Waldo Emerson
  15. Your goals are the road maps that guide you and show you what is possible for your life.” – Les Brown
  16. Make no small plans for they have no power to stir the soul.” – Niccolo Machiavelli
  17. “No dreamer is ever too small; no dream is ever too big.” – Unknown
  18. “Never let your memories be greater than your dreams.” – Doug Ivester
  19. “You got a dream, you gotta protect it. People can’t do something themselves, they wanna tell you you can’t do it. If you want something, go get it. Period.” – Pursuit of Happyness (Movie)
  20. “History shows us that the people who end up changing the world – the great political, social, scientific, technological, artistic, even sports revolutionaries – are always nuts, until they are right, and then they are geniuses.” – John Eliot
  21. “You will not do incredible things without an incredible dream.” – John Eliot
  22. “Instead of thinking about what you are going to do when you retire, think about how you can do that now and make a living from it.” – Celestine Chua

    Inspirational Quote: Discovering Your Ideal Life

  23. “Don’t be pushed by your problems; be led by your dreams.” – Unknown
  24. “Everything you want should be yours: the type of work you want; the relationships you need; the social, mental, and aesthetic stimulation that will make you happy and fulfilled; the money you require for the lifestyle that is appropriate to you; and any requirement that you may (or may not) have for achievement or service to others. If you don’t aim for it all, you’ll never get it all. To aim for it requires that you know what you want” ~ Richard Koch
  25. “I am not my memories. I am my dreams.” ~ Terry Hostetler
  26. “You are never too old to set another goal or to dream a new dream.” – Les Brown
  27. “Your imagination is your preview of life’s coming attractions.” ~ Albert Einstein
  28. “Every second you spend thinking about someone else’s dreams you take time away from your own.” – Yogi Ramen
  29. “What the mind can conceive, it can achieve.” – Napoleon Hill
  30. “20 years from now you will be disappointed by the things you didn’t do than by the one’s you did. So throw off the bowlines. Sail away from the safe harbor. Catch the trade winds in your sails. Explore. Dream. Discover” ~ Mark Twain

Source: http://personalexcellence.co/blog/101-most-inspiring-quotes-of-all-time/#dreams

The Top 10 Best Places to Visit in Denmark

Eversince I started learning and reading about Denmark I have been extremetly fascinated by everything the country has to offer from it’s beautiful parks, beaches, fods, people, language and of course the places and events that make Denmrk one of the best and unique countries to visit. I defently want to visit Denmark during the winter season because it’s much more beautiful and magical during the christmas season. Here are the top ten places to visit if you want to isit Denmark on your next vaction trip. I found all of these places to be really interesting. Now i wish I could go to Denmark, so bad, now! Here are the top ten places you should go see if your next trip is Denmark.

1. The Kronborg Castle near Halsingor

The Kronborg castle has been and stll is one of the top places to visit. This famous castle was shakespeare’s inspiration for “Elsinore” in his famous play Hamlet and is still widely visited by millions of tourists each year.

Fact: In Danish the castle’s name is Kronborg Slot. Tourists can find Kronborg castle at the northernmost tip of the Danish island of Zealand. This castle is also included in Hamlet castle Tour from Copenhagen and the North Zealand Castle Tour.

Kronborg Castle
Kronborg Castle
How Kronborg castle looks from the inside.
How Kronborg castle looks from the inside.

2. The Oresund Bridge Connecting Denmark and Sweden

This is defently one that you cannot miss. This scenic 10-mile bridge connects to Sweden and Denmark, carrying over 6,000 travelers by car or train everyday. The toll for driving across the Oresund bridge is paid at the toll station on the Swedish side.

Fun Fact about the Oresund Bridge: You might be wondering “When was the Oresund Bridge first built?” Well in 1991, the governments of both Denmark and Sweden made the desicion of biulding this huge project and it took many years to construct the bridge until finnally it was open on July 1, 2000.

The Oresund Bridge.
The Oresund Bridge.

3. The Original Legoland in Billund

I never knew before that there is a Legoland in Denmark, now I do! It is made pretty much everything is made out of blocks. I know there is one in San Diego, California also. But the one in Denmark is by the far the oldest, the park was first opened in 1968 and since then it still delights more Denamrk visitors each year. The park offers countless attractions and fun rides for all ages both young and old, along with it’s indoor activities, exhibitons, and new thrill rides Denmark’s Legoland is one of the best places you sure won’t want to miss.

the entrance to the Billund Legoland theme park.
the entrance to the Billund Legoland theme park.
The statue of liberty in legoland Denmark.
The statue of liberty in legoland Denmark.
A map of the theme park, Legoland in Billund, Denmark. It shows the different places the park has and when each place was built.
A map of the theme park, Legoland in Billund, Denmark. It shows the different places the park has and when each place was built.
A lego lion:)
A lego lion:)
so beautiful:)
so beautiful:)

The old town of Arhus, Denmark

The city of Arhus, Denamrk has a really old city that’s full of history. If you are not far from this city then don’t hesitate to visit this historic city. This city is full of rich beautiful houses, little shops, and food and drink on offer, and many other interesting things to look at. Travelers get 50% off Old Town admission from January until March, and the best part is that children under 18 enter free.

the old town of Aarhus, Denmark.
the old town of Aarhus, Denmark.

The Island of Bornholm

Bronholm is a Danish island in the Baltic Sea, it is east of Denamrk and south Sweden, it’s nickname is “Pearl of the Baltic” there are beautiful beaches, bicycle paths, and architecture from the 1800’s. You don’t neccesarily need a car to get to Bornholm- buses, bicycles, and Danish taxis are everywhere. The easiest way to get to Bornholm, fly to Ronne-Bornholm Airport or check out the ferry connections.

The Bornholm island in Denmark.
The Bornholm island in Denmark.

The Beaches in Denmark

Doesn’t matter on what time of year or season you visit Denmark, it diesn’t mean you should miss a trip to the nearest beach (even if it’s not one of the best beaches in Denamrk) During the warm summer months of July and August, it’s warm enough to go swimming. With it’s coastline of Denmark, it’s sand dunes and greenery is a sight that seems to change always. It is also recommendedthat you bring your camera and watch for WWII bunkers and lighthouses.

Ocean Beach in Denmark.
Ocean Beach in Denmark.
Lights Beach in Denmark.
Lights Beach in Denmark.
Green Pool in Denmark.
Green Pool in Denmark.
elephant rocks in Denmark
elephant rocks in Denmark
elephant rock cove in Denmark
elephant rock cove in Denmark
Waterfall beach in Denmark
Waterfall beach in Denmark
Madfish bay in Denmark
Madfish bay in Denmark
Mazzoletti beach
Mazzoletti beach
Parry Beach in Denmark
Parry Beach in Denmark
Anvil Beach in Denmark
Anvil Beach in Denmark
Peaceful bay in Denmark
Peaceful bay in Denmark
Shelley Beach in Denmark
Shelley Beach in Denmark
Cosy Corner in Denmark
Cosy Corner in Denmark

Amelieborg Castle in Copenhagen

Amelieborg Castle in Copenhagen is the winter residence of Denmark’s royalty. As well as a popular attraction in Denmark. Amelieborg castle combines four externally uniformed palaces and a courtyard. Travelers can witness the changing of the guards daily and or enter two Amalienborg’s palaces. A visit here is also part of the Copenhagen Grand Tour.

The Amalienborg castle
The Amalienborg castle
The changing of the guards at Amalienborg Castle.
The changing of the guards at Amalienborg Castle.
Queen Margrethe II and Prince Henrik of Denmark at the Amalienborg castle the home of the royal family.
Queen Margrethe II and Prince Henrik of Denmark at the Amalienborg castle the home of the royal family.

The Little Mermaid in Copenhagen

I love this attraction although it’s one of the smallest it’s still one of the best and most unique and amazing. Everytime I see a picture of the little Mermaid it almost makes me think of a Denmark full of magic and wonder on every place that you go. The Little Mermaid is just 4 feet tall! that’s not too big! She sits close to the shore of the cruise harbor “Langelinie” on her granite resting place, in the harbor are Nyhavn. It is a short walk from the main cruise pier, nearby many of Copenhagen’s other major attractions and locations.

The Little Mermaid of Denmark.
The Little Mermaid of Denmark.

The Tivoli Park in Copenhagen

Another attraction that sure looks amazing and that you won’t want to miss for sure especially if you’re traveling with your family, the Tivoli should be at the top of your list of places to see. This park has serene park areas and activities for the little ones to rides for the thrill seeking teens and adults in the family. This fun park is open everyday in the summer from 11 am to 10 pm and midnight.

The Tivoli Gardens in Denmark
The Tivoli Gardens in Denmark
Tivoli gardens at night:)
Tivoli gardens at night:)

The Stroget in Copenhagen

The Stroget in Copenhagen is one of Europe’s longest shopping streets and one of Denamrk’s top sights. An insider-tip fro all shoppers: cost consious travelers and bargain- hunters should begin shopping at the Radhuspladsen end of the Stroget. There you will find lower prices, simpler foods, clothing chains like H&M, and other reasonable offers in general.

The Stroget in Denmark
The Stroget in Denmark
an outdoor eating restaurant in Stroget, Denmark.
an outdoor eating restaurant in Stroget, Denmark.

The Top 10 Places in Switzerland

Swiss cows-ASwitzerland, one of Europe’s perennially popular travel destinations, has fascinated American travelers ever since the days of the legendary Grand Tour. While its reputation for après-ski chicness, Heidi-like mountain villages and outstanding world-class hotels is renowned among tourists, if you peel back the promotional veneer you’ll discover a multi-faceted destination that transcends the tourist-brochure hype and provides a world of experiences for the more sophisticated traveler.

For those travelers, here are the top tourism destinations in Switzerland, as reported by Switzerland Tourism. (Photos courtesy of Switzerland Tourism unless otherwise noted)

1. Zurich

Zürich lies not only in the heart of Europe but also in the hearts of those who have made the city the top destination in Switzerland. Set on the northern shores of Lake Zürich with a magnificent view of the snowcapped Alps on the horizon, Zürich’s multicultural flair and variety of leisure activities makes it popular with travelers from all over the world.

The city’s downtown offers a unique mixture of attractions – over 50 museums and more than 100 art galleries, shops selling international fashion labels as well as Zürich designs, and the most flamboyant and lively nightlife in the country. Recreational activities range from sailing on the lake in the very heart of the city, to a spectacular hike on the Uetliberg Mountain.

The city is easy to reach, by train, plane or car. Its international airport is only a 10-minute train ride from downtown and Zürich’s Main Railway Station is regarded as a central European railroad hub.

2. Geneva

Set between nearby Alpine peaks and the hilly terrain of the Jura, French-speaking Geneva lies in the bay where the Rhone leaves Lake Geneva. With its humanitarian tradition and cosmopolitan flair, Geneva is the European seat of the United Nations and headquarters of the Red Cross, adding to its reputation as the “Capital of Peace.”

Travelers find the city’s old town, with its quays, lakeside promenades, elegant shops, parks and lively side streets, an inviting place to stroll. The famous Jet d’Eau, a fountain with a near-500 foot-high water jet that is set in Lake Geneva, is an icon of the city

Culturally, this city on the westernmost fringe of Switzerland has much to offer. International artists perform in the Grand Théâtre and the Opera House, and there’s a diverse range of museums including —  what else — the Musée international de l’horlogerie, a watch museum with a collection of jewelry watches and musical clocks.

3. Lucerne

To many travelers Lucerne is the essence of Switzerland. The gateway to central part if the country, it sits picture-perfect on Lake Lucerne, set below a beautiful panorama of the Alps.

Add to this picturesque setting a car-free old town with gable paintings; a covered, medieval bridge in the center of town (one of the oldest covered wooden bridges in Europe); historic houses decorated with frescoes; and charming town squares, and you’ll understand why Lucerne is perennially popular. But the traditional also stands side-by-side with modernity here, and the town has earned a reputation for innovative design. The futuristic Culture and Convention Centre (KKL), designed by leading French architect Jean Nouvel, is one the architectural highlights of the town.

Outside Lucerne you’ll find beautiful views on a trip up one of its nearby mountains, and enjoy a great experience on a steamship cruise along the beautiful lake. The city is a good starting point for excursions about central Switzerland.

4.  Interlaken

Interlaken, in Switzerland’s Bernese Oberland Region between Lake Thun and Lake Brienz, is presided over by the three mighty mountains: the Eiger, Mönch and Jungfrau.

Interlaken is considered the adventure capital of Switzerland and its more than 45 mountain railways, cable cars, chair lifts and ski lifts lead the adventurous to 150 miles of slopes and a dense network of hiking trails. Every day in the winter season, visitors benefit from the city’s central location by being able to choose from several different area ski regions.

In the warmer months those who like to paraglide head for Beatenberg-Niederhorn, a popular area just 7 miles away. Those with less lofty ambitions enjoy cruises on Lake Thun and Lake Brienz aboard excursion boats, including historic paddle steamers.

5. Lake Geneva Region

The Lake Geneva Region, encompassing Lausanne. Lauvaux and Montreux, has two UNESCO World Heritage Site listings and is the fifth most popular area of Switzerland.

The setting of Lausanne is so picturesque it’s not surprising the International Olympic Committee has been based here since 1914. The town, built on three hills, is surrounded by vineyard-covered slopes, with Lake Geneva at its feet and the Savoy Alps of France across the lake. The attractive old town, dominated by the cathedral regarded as Switzerland’s most impressive piece of early Gothic architecture, is filled with cafes and boutiques shaping the streetscape in the medieval city center.

Nearby Lavaux is a wonderful world of vineyard terraces. At 800 hectares it is Switzerland’s largest contiguous vineyard area with terraces that not only offer magnificent views, but also produce such fine wines as St-Saphorin, Dézaley and Epesses. Travelers can taste them on visits to one of the charming pintes, mini-restaurants typical of the Lavaux.

Montreux, home of the world-famous Montreux Jazz Festival that takes place annually in June/July, is surrounded by vineyards set against the breathtaking backdrop of snow-covered Alps. Because of the exceptionally mild climate many plants associated with the Mediterranean, such as pines, cypresses and palms grow here.

6. Basel

Bisected by the Rhine, and nestled between Germany and France, Basel is the third largest city in Switzerland. Given its geographical position it should come as no surprise that a diversity of cultures, a multifaceted history and modern art and architecture converge here.

Travelers know the city for its historic landmarks, including the large market square with its richly decorated red sandstone town hall and the late Romanesque-Gothic cathedral. Basel is known as “The City of Art” and its nearly 40 museums give it the highest density of museums in the country. Among them are the internationally known Basel Art Museum, the museum devoted to the iron sculptor Jean Tinguely, the Fondation Beyeler and the Museum of Cultures, all of which attract a great many visitors, as do several galleries and playhouses and its symphony orchestra, chamber orchestra and musical theatre featuring international productions.

The yearly Fasnacht (Carnival) is the most important celebration for the people of Basel. On the Monday following Ash Wednesday the city rises with the “Morgenstraich,” a colorful and brilliant procession through the streets of the city that begins when the lights of the city are extinguished at exactly 4:00am..

7. Zermatt

In the Valais region of Switzerland, popular Zermatt lies at the foot of Matterhorn, the most photographed mountain in the world. Its location in the middle of an enormous hiking and ski region makes it one of the world’s most attractive vacation villages.

The ski region encompasses 63 mountain railways and more than 200 miles of slopes. The region called “Matterhorn Glacier Paradise“ is Europe’s largest and highest-lying summer skiing region, a place where many national ski teams train in the summer.

The region is also legendary amongst mountaineers: the Haute Route, a challenging international route that takes several days to complete, leads from Mont Blanc to Zermatt. Over 400 kilometers of hiking trails lead through and out of the Matter Valley, including the mule traders’ trails, which date back to the 13th century.

Zermatt’s hotels and restaurants are world-class and the air is clear, dry and clean – likely due to a law enacted in 1947 that allows only electric cars without a combustion engine to operate in the village.

8. Engadin St. Moritz

Located at 1,800 m above sea level in the alpine canton of Graubünden, and blessed with 322 days of sunshine a year, the 13 towns and villages of the Engadin St. Moritz region enjoy a gloriously mild microclimate. Travelers are lured here by a unique combination of chic atmosphere, authentic village tradition and unspoiled nature. The Upper Engadin provides spectacular mountain views, a seemingly endless expanse of lake plateau and, to some, a magical quality in the light.

The area has a fascinating cultural heritage – while Romansch is its official main language, German is spoken in St. Moritz, Italian in the neighboring valleys, French at the Club Med and a lot of English at the Cresta Run, a ¾ mile long toboggan track that winds its way from St Moritz down past the tiny hamlet of Cresta, to the village of Celerina.

9. Bern

Of all of Switzerland’s cities, Bern, the capital city, is perhaps the most immediately charming. Crammed onto a steep-sided peninsula in a crook of the fast-flowing River Aare, its quiet, cobbled lanes are lined with sandstone arcaded buildings that have changed little over the past 500 years with the exception, perhaps, of the addition of modern shop signs and the odd car or tram rattling past.

The hills all around, and the steep banks of the river, are still heavily wooded. The old town of Bern is a UNESCO World Heritage Site, thanks in part to its four miles of arcades, which the locals refer to as “Lauben,” making it the longest weather-sheltered shopping promenade in Europe. Views of the area, especially of both the Old Town’s clustered roofs and of the majestic Alps on the horizon, are beautiful.

10. Ticino

The Mediterranean region seems to begin on the southern side of the Alps in Ticino. There is a feel of Italy here, with palm trees and citrus trees scattered about, and streets winding their way down to little piazzas. This is Switzerland’s only Italian-speaking canton and here the Italian love of food, wine and la dolce vita somehow finds harmony with the Swiss respect for regulations and rules.

The city of Bellinzona, capital of the canton, and the valleys of Upper Ticino are beautiful and home to a rich gastronomy, fascinating art and wide stretches of unspoiled nature. Bellinzona’s three castles, defensive wall and ramparts of the old market town are listed as World heritage Sites by UNESCO. The city of Lugano, set on the lake of the same name, is Switzerland’s third financial center.

The Lake Maggiore region is exceptionally rich in contrasts and packed with variety – from the palm-lined lakeshores to glaciers, chic shopping and ancient traditions. The lakeside town of Locarno enjoys what is probably the best climate in Switzerland, with nearly 2300 hours of sunshine a year and an average annual temperature of 60°F. The town has several cultural events, including an international Film Festival.

The Mendrisiotto Region of Ticino s particularly well known for the delicious food and wine. At its traditional inns (called grotto) you can taste a wide variety of Ticino specialties and wines produced in the region.

11. Appenzell

The village of Appenzell and the Canton of Appenzell Innerrhoden are situated in a singularly beautiful landscape of rolling hills. The region is known for rural customs and traditions such as the ceremonial descent of the cattle in autumn and cultural events such as folk music and rustic dances, as well as hiking and biking tours in the Alpstein region.

With about 7,000 inhabitants, Appenzell is the political, economic and cultural center of Appenzell Innerrhoden, the smallest Swiss canton. The car-free village beckons with pretty lanes and a myriad of small stores and boutiques that are ideal for shopping and browsing. The facades of the buildings are decorated with frescoes. Appenzell Museum, which is in the town hall, shows a cross section of Appenzell’s history and culture.

A dense network of hiking trails crisscrosses the hilly landscape of Appenzell. The Alpstein region with 2500-meter-high rock formations lends itself to challenging hiking tours and climbing trips. Approximately 200 kilometers of cross-country tracks and three popular ski areas beckon in the winter.

Source: http://www.neverstoptraveling.com/the-top-10-places-in-switzerland